Bibliography & Further Reading

Brown, J. (2015. August 21). “Science Fiction Is Really, Really White.” Retrieved from Vocativ, http://www.vocativ.com/224223/science-fiction-is-really-really-white/

Frank, P. (2016, April 25). Your Brief And Far-Out Guide To Afrofuturism. Retrieved from The Huffington Post: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/your-far-out-guide-to-afrofuturism-and-black-magic_us_5711403fe4b0060ccda34a37

The Hugo Awards. (n.d.) Hugo Awards by Year. Retrieved from The Hugo Awards, http://www.thehugoawards.org/hugo-history/

Womack, Y. (2013). Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture. Chicago Review.

Yaszek, L., & Canavan, G. (2015). “Afrofuturism in American Science Fiction.” In E. C. Link (Ed.), The Cambridge Companion to American Science Fiction (pp. 59-69). Cambridge University Press.

 

For more Afrofuturism, check out these books.

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Dark Matter: A Century of Speculative Fiction from the African Diaspora (2000) edited by Sheree Renee Thomas

This volume introduces black science fiction, fantasy, and speculative fiction writers to the generations of readers who have not had the chance to explore the scope and diversity among African-American writers. (summary via Google Books)

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Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements (2015) edited by Walidah Imarisha and adrienne maree brown

Whenever we envision a world without war, without prisons, without capitalism, we are producing speculative fiction. Organizers and activists envision, and try to create, such worlds all the time. Walidah Imarisha and adrienne maree brown have brought twenty of them together in the first anthology of short stories to explore the connections between radical speculative fiction and movements for social change. (summary via Google Books)